WHY SONDERBORG?

 

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A GLOOMY OUTLOOK

Like many other rural areas in Europe the Sønderborg region is in a negative spiral. While the proportion of elderly are growing steadily, the younger generations are moving to the large cities. The result is that the region is drained of competencies. A wide range of statistics and prognosis have doomed Sønderborg and most of the region as well as northern Germany to be an isolated area,where growth has stalled or gone backwards.

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Dybboel Mill in Sonderborg 
 

HISTORY SURROUNDING BORDER CREATES THE ISOLATION

ISønderborg and the region of Southern Jutland used to be a part of the Schleswig Duchy, and a citizen was first and foremost a citizen of Schleswig. The Danish, German and Frisian languages blended together. But Sønderborg became the center of bloody wars.
Dybbøl Mill has been shot to ruins twice – the last time was in 1864, almost 150 years ago. Denmark then lost a third of its land mass and the whole region of Southern Jutland became German.

After a plebiscite following World War I the current border was settled. Still bottlenecks in cross-border cooperation remain in everyday life, which continue to isolate the border region.

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The Prussians of Redoubt 2 after the battle on April 18th 1864.
One of the first examples of war photography. 
 
 
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The Austro-Prussian conquest of Als in 1864 was painted by Wilhelm Camphausen.